Blog Tour, Book Review, Books

BLOG TOUR: What Happens Now by Sophia Money-Coutts

WhatHappensNow_BTB

I am so excited to be part of the Blog Tour for What Happens Now by Sophia Money-Coutts! Thank you to the team at HQ, for being so kind to send me a copy of this book!

Without further delays, let’s see what I thought…

What happens now? by Sophia Money-Coutts the plus one hq stories harpercollins harper collins book books book review goodreads netgalley blog tour publishing day diary of difference diaryofdifference

What Happens Now by Sophia Money-Coutts is a wonderful story that features Lil, who is a normal lady, living a normal life. She thought she has found ”the one”, but after so many years, this fellow dumps her for a twenty-year old blonde girl.

Doing what everyone should do, she moves on, and tries to find a new match, choosing a dating app and swiping right. She finds a handsome man that seems to like her and arranges a date. She gets ready, meets this guy, has a few drinks and spends the night at his apartment.

What is the worse thing that can happen? 

Well – firstly, he doesn’t seem to respond to her messages at all. And then, she discovers that he is, in fact, the famous mountaineer Max, who is currently out there somewhere, climbing a mountain and can’t actually see her messages, the Max who is possibly Prince William’s best friend. But on top of it all, after weeing on a stick, she discovers she is pregnant with his baby.

So now Lil is single, thirty-one and living in a small flat in London, and this is not how she expected to become a mum. But our lady Lil here is probably the bravest woman I have ever encountered in my books, and she decides to do this whole motherhood thing on her own. Yes – she really likes Max, and it would be amazing if he gets involved too, but she doesn’t need him really. She can do this!

Throughout this book I felt so empowered to read about Lil’s daily challenges and I was cheering for her all the way through. She, and all women in the world that had the courage to give birth to and raise a child on their own should be praised, and I can’t think of any words to describe how brave these people are and how much I admire them!

Lucky for Lil, she has her mother and her stepdad along her way throughout the whole journey, and these two people are the friendliest and kindest people in the world.

And then there’s Jess – Lil’s best friend, who is, by the way, THE BEST FRIEND anyone wants. She was EVERYTHING and I loved her so much! She was always there for Lil, giving the best advises in the world. We all need a Jess in our lives!

And to be honest, given my low opinion on Sophia’s first book, The Plus One, I didn’t have high expectations on this one, but I think she outdid herself and created a masterpiece! The writing style has improved so much, that you wouldn’t notice these two books have been written by the same author.

I loved reading about Lil’s journey – I truly did. The writing was gorgeous and I couldn’t put the book down. Very empowering, but at the same time a very light summer read. I recommend it to all of you – read What Happens Now? this summer, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Purchase Links:
| Amazon UK |Amazon US |

Social Media:
Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram | Pinterest

 

Advertisements
Book Review, Books

Bright Pink Ink by Laura Dinovis Berry

Book review books goodreads reading netgalley publisher bright pink ink new and selected poems laura dinovis berry diary of difference diaryofdifference

‘’I was born to destroy everything you ever loved before me.’’

It is very hard for me to judge this work and write a book review. It’s hard to tell you what I think because I don’t feel like I’m an expert in poetry.  I love reading poetry, but I don’t read it as much. I love poetry, but maybe I don’t understand it.

Bright Pink Ink: New and Selected Poems has a jolly vibe to it, a lot of love & happiness, emotions of loss, missing loved ones and love, as well as a feminist vibe that is refreshing. It was an enjoyable read. 

However, it also holds a little bit if monotony with it, very short poems or poems that are written as prose. I encountered a few repetitive sentences on a few occasions and while I know that repeating a line is common in poetry to straighten the meaning and add rhythm – in this occasion it wasn’t pleasurable to read. 

“Maybe I should tell them about my husband’s laugh. A sound that erupts as suns inside me till I float – free as dust.” 

I loved ‘’A poem from 4/14/2015 read on 6/21/2017’’. It is written quite well, with two parallel stories happening while you read, in a different timeline. I really enjoyed it, despite the great annoyance that is the date. The only logical date format I know of is day – month – year. 

There were a lot of feminist vibes through the poems, which was pleasantly enjoyable. On this topic, “Mortal Gods Demand a Sacrifice” was my favourite one. 

“The moon must’ve thought you were the sun.” 

Thank you to the author Laura Dinovis Berry for sending me a copy of Bright Pink Ink in exchange for an honest review. 

Purchase Links:
| Amazon UK |Amazon US |

Social Media:
Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram | Pinterest

 

Books, Down The TBR Hole Tag

Down The TBR Hole #44 | Down The TBR Hole Tag

down the tbr hole post book review books blog diary of difference diaryofdifference ivana reads reading goodreads tag booklovers

Welcome to the 43rd edition of my Down The TBR Hole Posts.

This weekend I have interesting selection to go through with you…

How Down the TBR Hole works: 

❤ 1. Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
❤ 2. Order on ascending date added.
❤ 3. Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books.
❤ 4. Read the synopsis of the books.
❤ 5. Time to Decide: keep it or should it go

Here’s the next patch:

down the tbr hole romance book blog goodreads netgalley love diary of difference diaryofdifference mike omer daughter of the empire the sea john banville nigella lawson i love you too much alicia drake ripperville david bowie

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

Synopsis: 

I was born twice first as a baby girl on a remarkably smogless Detroit day of January 1960 and then again as a teenage boy in an emergency room near Petoskey Michigan in August of l974. So begins the breathtaking story of Calliope and three generations of the Greek-American Stephanides family who travel from a tiny village in Asia Minor to Prohibition-era Detroit before they move out to the tree-lined streets of suburban Grosse Point Michigan. To understand why she is not like other girls Calliope has to uncover a guilty family secret and the astonishing genetic history that turns her into Cal one of the most audacious and wondrous narrators in contemporary fiction. Lyrical and thrilling Middlesex is an exhilarating reinvention of the American epic.

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

At My Table: A Celebration of Home Cooking by Nigella Lawson

Synopsis:

Nigella Lawson is a champion of the home cook and her new book celebrates the food she loves to cook for friends and family. The recipes are warming, comforting, and inspirational, from new riffs on classic dishes – including Chicken Fricassee and Sticky Toffee Pudding – to adventures in a host of new dishes and ingredients, from Aubergine Fattet to White Miso Hummus.

AT MY TABLE includes dishes to inspire all cooks and eaters, from Hake with Bacon, Peas and Cider to Indian-Spiced Chicken and Potato Traybake and Chilli Mint Lamb Cutlets; plus a host of colourful vegetable dishes, like Eastern Mediterranean Chopped Salad and Carrots and Fennel with Harissa.

No Nigella cookbook would be complete without sweet treats, and AT MY TABLE is no exception, with Emergency Brownies, White Chocolate Cheesecake and a Victoria Sponge with Cardamom, Marmalade and Crème Fraiche set to become family favourites.

As Nigella writes, ‘happiness is best shared’ and the food in this book will be served and savoured at your own kitchen table just as it is at hers.

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

I Love You Too Much by Alicia Drake

Synopsis:

I knew I was in Paris, I knew that was the Seine beneath me, the sky above, but when I looked around for help, the grand apartment buildings of the Quai Voltaire stared back at me, indifferent.

In the sixth arrondissement everything is perfect except for the loneliness. This is the Paris of thirteen-year-old Paul. Shy and unloved, he quietly observes the lives of the self-involved grown-ups around him: his glamorous Maman, Séverine, her younger musician lover, Gabriel, and his fitness-obsessed Papa, Philippe. Always overlooked, it’s only a matter of time before Paul witnesses something that he’s not supposed to see…

Seeking solace in an unlikely friendship with tear-away classmate Scarlett and the temptation of the numerous patisseries in his elegant neighbourhood, Paul searches for unconditional love. But what will he do if he can’t find it?

Alicia Drake evokes contemporary Parisian life with the subtlety of a latter day Francois Sagan, and she captures in Paul the pains of adolescence as poignantly as Salinger’s Holden Caulfield. I Love You Too Much is a novel of extraordinary intelligence and heart, a devastating coming of age story told from the sidelines of Parisian perfection.”

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

Ripperville by Roger David Francis

Synopsis: 

Victorian London hides a deadly secret. Bloodshed stains the cobbled streets.
An innocent boy born in poverty takes a path that will ultimately lead him to become one of the most notorious serial killers of the 19th century.
One hundred and thirty years later Alice procures a painting. Little does she know the dark alleyway in the picture will take her on as journey through time revealing the truth about Jack the Ripper.
Stalked by a strange man Alice discovers he has a connection to Whitechapel.
Can she alter the events unfolding and prevent further murders?
Will the past catch up with her?

Verdict: KEEP ☑ 

On Bowie by Rob Sheffield

Synopsis: 

On Bowie is a thoughtful and loving meditation on the life of the late David Bowie that explores his creative legacy and the enduring and mutual connection he enjoyed with his fans

Innovative. Pioneering. Brave. Until his death in January 2016, David Bowie created art that not only pushed boundaries, but helped fans understand themselves and view the world from fantastic new perspectives.

When the shocking news of his death on January 10, 2016 broke, the outpouring of grief and adulation was immediate and ongoing. Fans around the world and across generations paid homage to this brilliant, innovate, ever-evolving artist who both shaped and embodied our times.

In this concise and penetrating book, highly-regarded Rolling Stone critic, bestselling author, and lifelong Bowie fan Rob Sheffield shares his own feelings about the passing of this icon and explains why Bowie’s death has elicited such an unprecedented emotional outpouring from so many.

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

The Beautiful and the Cursed (The Dispossessed, #1) by Page Morgan

Synopsis:

After a bizarre accident, Ingrid Waverly is forced to leave London with her mother and younger sister, Gabby, trading a world full of fancy dresses and society events for the unfamiliar city of Paris.

In Paris there are no grand balls or glittering parties, and, disturbingly, the house Ingrid’s twin brother, Grayson, found for them isn’t a house at all. It’s an abandoned abbey, its roof lined with stone gargoyles that could almost be mistaken for living, breathing creatures.

And Grayson has gone missing.

No one seems to know of his whereabouts but Luc, a devastatingly handsome servant at their new home.

Ingrid is sure her twin isn’t dead—she can feel it deep in her soul—but she knows he’s in grave danger. It will be up to her and Gabby to navigate the twisted path to Grayson, a path that will lead Ingrid on a discovery of dark secrets and otherworldly truths. And she’ll learn that once they are uncovered, they can never again be buried.

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

The Sea by John Banville

Synopsis:

When art historian Max Morden returns to the seaside village where he once spent a childhood holiday, he is both escaping from a recent loss and confronting a distant trauma.

The Grace family had appeared that long-ago summer as if from another world. Mr and Mrs Grace, with their worldly ease and candour, were unlike any adults he had met before. But it was his contemporaries, the Grace twins (silent, expressionless Myles, and fiery, seductively poised and forthright Chloe), who most fascinated Max. He grew to know them intricately, even intimately, and what ensured would haunt him for the rest of his years and shape everything that was to follow.

Written in Banville’s precise and hauntingly beautiful prose, The Sea is both a reconciliation with loss and an extraordinary meditation on identity and remembrance. Utterly compelling, profoundly moving and illuminating, it is unquestionably one of the finest works yet from a sublime master of language.

 

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

Daughter of the Empire (The Empire Trilogy, #1) by Raymond E. Feist

Synopsis:

Set in the mysterious world of the Kelewan, Mara, Ruling Lady of the Acoma, is forced to protect her honour and her people in the ruthless Game of the Council.

Verdict: KEEP ☑ 

A Girl Like You by Gemma Burgess

Synopsis:

I’ve discovered the secret to successful singledom. I’m acting like a man. And it’s working.

After breaking up with her boyfriend of, well, forever, Abigail Wood must learn how to be single from scratch. Her dating skills are abysmal, and she ricochets from disaster to disaster – until Robert, one of London’s most notorious lotharios, agrees to coach her. With his advice, she learns to navigate the bastard-infested waters of the bar scene and practices the art of being bulletproof. The new Abigail is cocky, calm, composed… but what happens when she meets her match?

Verdict: REMOVE ✖

A Killer’s Mind (Zoe Bentley Mystery, #1) by Mike Omer

Synopsis:

A chilling thriller of serial murder and dark secrets that will leave you wondering, is the past really in the past?

Three Chicago women have been found strangled, embalmed, and posed as if still alive. Doubting the findings of the local PD’s profiler, The FBI calls on forensic psychologist Zoe Bentley to investigate.

Zoe quickly gets off on the wrong foot with her new partner, Special Agent Tatum Gray. Zoe’s a hunter, intense and focused; Tatum’s a smug maverick with little respect for the rules. Together, they must descend into a serial killer’s psyche and untangle his twisted fantasies, or more women will die. But when the contents of three inconspicuous envelopes reveal a chilling connection to gruesome murders from Zoe’s childhood, suddenly the hunter becomes the hunted.

Verdict: KEEP ☑ 

flower-divider-flower-dividers-clip-art-flowers-line-divider-stock-vector-illustration-of-elegantI removed 7 books this time. Great progress!
This is how my TBR list looks like now.

Which books would you keep or remove? Let me know in the comments.

FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest

Book Review, Books

It’s a Bright World To Feel Lost In by Mawson Bear

It's a bright world to feel lost in mawson bear mark o'dwyer book review books blog blogging one star

I love cute little books, especially when they contain something emotional or motivating around them.

This book was one of those cute little books that you pick up now and then, have a quick read through and then go on with your life. And that is the reason why I chose to review it. 

The book is supposedly written by a bear called Mawson that gives life advice. And it’s meant for adults, not children. It doesn’t follow any particular story – in fact – it all seems to be a bit of randomly places throughout the pages, with a lot of adorable pictures of a teddy bear doing things. However, I was having some troubles understanding this book. 

The teddy bear is so cute and the images are indeed adorable, but I found the text depressing, rather than motivating. Yes – it is a bright world to feel lost in, and we do find ourselves lost all the time. But what can we do about it? What is the teddy bear doing about it? I just didn’t get it. I don’t think the messaging was there. I am not sure the author delivered everything that he wanted to say in this book. 

The words had random capital letters, a few spelling errors, and they were also randomly places on the pages, alongside the images, which to some people might be appealing, but to me – it just puts me off. I understand this is the bear typing….. but as I said – definitely annoyed me and I found it ridiculous. 

I know I am supposed to love this book, because it has a teddy bear on the cover – but I just didn’t. 

Thank you to the author (bear’s guardian) Mark O’Dwyer for sending across this book to me in exchange for an honest review. 

Purchase Links:
| Amazon UK |Amazon US |

Social Media:
Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram | Pinterest

 

Book Review, Books

Sarong Party Girls by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan

sarong party girls book review books diaryofdifference diary of difference blog blogging blogger asian cheryl lu-lien tan author readersfirst

★★★

A quick Chick-Lit, written in Singlish, an English-based patois that Singaporeans speak to each other. It was interesting and unique, and given the fact that I haven’t read anything like this before, I genuinely enjoyed the writing. This is my first book from Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan. 

Our main heroine in this book is Jazzy, a 27-year-old, born and living in Singapore. In her mind, she is getting old and her time to get married is running out. 

But Jazzy doesn’t want to just marry anyone, especially not the Asian boys she keeps seeing in the clubs, or the ones that are so traditional and bring her mum soup in the mornings. She wants to marry an English Man, become rich, move abroad and have his babies. 

To achieve this, Jazzy and her friends make a deal to start going into clubs and places and meet their perfect English men. They become Sarong Party Girls, and from chapter to chapter we read about new adventures and troubles that Jazzy gets herself into. 

This book is unique in many ways, there are a lot of immoral scenes that teach us moral lessons. There is so much culture in this book and it’s nice to see how people tolerate moral levels differently in another part of the world. 

I didn’t like Jazzy, and I didn’t agree with almost anything she was doing. From chapter to chapter she kept making stupid decisions, and even though she learnt a little bit in the end, she was still clueless at so many things, which I find annoying. 

As much as I loved the refreshing taste of culture this book gave me, I also didn’t enjoy the main character at all, and am struggling to give it anything more than three stars. 

It is an amazing book, with quality writing that I am sure represents Singaporeans well, culture a plenty and many scenes that trigger discussions. But if you are looking for your perfect character, you won’t find this is Jazzy. You won’t find it in Sarong Party Girls. 

Thank you to ReadersFirst and Allen & Unwin for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase Links:
| Amazon UK |Amazon US |

Social Media:
Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram | Pinterest