Book Review · Books

The 100 (The 100 #1) by Kass Morgan [BOOK REVIEW]

The 100 (The 100 #1) by Kass Morgan [BOOK REVIEW]

I thought I wouldn’t enjoy “The 100” by Kass Morgan because I’ve seen the first season of the TV Show. However, reading the story was a brand-new experience and I loved it a lot!

Synopsis:

No one has set foot on Earth in centuries — until now.

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents — considered expendable by society — are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.

CLARKE was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. WELLS, the chancellor’s son, came to Earth for the girl he loves — but will she ever forgive him? Reckless BELLAMY fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And GLASS managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.

Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.

The 100 (The 100 #1) by Kass Morgan [BOOK REVIEW]

Pages: 323

Genre: Young Adult, Dystopia, Science Fiction

Publisher: Hodder

Format I read it in: Paperback

Rating: ★★★★

Thoughts:

Reading “The 100”, I got to create my own characters in my head. I got to know them and interestingly enough, my feelings for some of them changed as well. 

From the very first chapter, the book kept me hooked. 100 people that are imprisoned in space are being sent back to Earth, while no one knows if it’s safe for them to go. But because they are considered scum, they are used as guinea pigs. If they manage to survive, more people will follow to come back and start living back on Earth again. The fake democracy that rules the spaceships felt quite real to the present day, way too familiar for some reason. 

Throughout the book, we get a glimpse of the lives of four different characters. Clarke, I didn’t really care that much about. She seems to always need something and can’t do things on her own. Then, among the other characters, we also have the chancellor’s son, Wells, who, to me, tries to justify his actions in the name of love. To save the girl he loves, he put a lot of people in danger. 

The biggest reason I loved The 100 is the psychological side of it.

You get 100 people and you put them in a certain situation, and you never know how they will react. When they are left to their own devices, and it’s up to them to decide the rules, the rules no longer apply. And sometimes, this releases the worst in people. 

What do you do when your belief of justice is not the same as other people’s beliefs? There is no one to protect you, and no one to fight your battles for you. It’s a game of survival and only the strongest will thrive. And that may not always be the fairest way, but it is the truth… 

Amazing plot and good action between space and Earth – I am quite intrigued about how things ended and quite excited to see where things go in the next book in the series. 100% would recommend! 🙂

About The Author:

The 100 (The 100 #1) by Kass Morgan [BOOK REVIEW]

Kass Morgan studied literature at Brown and Oxford, and now resides in Brooklyn, where she lives in constant fear of her Ikea bookcase collapsing and burying her under a mound of science fiction and Victorian novels.

Twitter: @Kassmorganbooks

Social Media:
| WishlistKo-fi | FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest |

Book Review · Books

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire [BOOK REVIEW]

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire [BOOK REVIEW]

Middlegame has easily become, and will stay for a long time, one of my ultimate favourite books of all time. I am so glad I won it as a giveaway, as otherwise this book may never have found me. 

About The Book:

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 528

Genre: Fiction, Fantasy, Science Fiction

Publisher: Tor

Format I read it in: Paperback

Rating: ★★★★★

About Middlegame:

I went in unprepared, and loved the experience I was introduced to. I read the synopsis, but the book didn’t do it justice. There is so much going on that one blurb could never be able to explain. You will get to meet twins Roger and Dodger. Roger is very good with languages and stories. Dodger is amazing with maths. Numbers come so easy for her, and they are her world. Roger and Dodger are not actually human, although they don’t know it. The bond they have between them is special, and it serves a special purpose in the world. They are two pieces in a puzzle, and need each other’s abilities to unlock their full potential. 

“The unspoken pieces of language are sometimes the most painful.”

And even though they’re twins, they live in separate states and can communicate in a unique way. This was actually one of the most intriguing parts for me – I loved how they get to know each other and start communicating, and also how throughout the years, despite all the challenges, they keep finding their way to each other. 

“Heredity is not only in blood. It is in the sympathetic vibration of the universe, in the places where atom becomes alchemy.”

Roger and Dodger were created by Reed, an alchemist, who has goals of his own. His plan is to raise the twins to the highest power, to ascend with them and claim their authority as his own. I particularly liked Reed’s chapters. I enjoyed these, as they show a much larger picture of the motives behind what he is doing and to learn more about what the Doctrine is.

“Ignorance is bliss, or at least ignorance leads to better choices: ignorance doesn’t try to account for the costs and consequences of a hundred doomed timelines every time it takes a step.”

My Thoughts:

As I said, the blurb doesn’t do this book justice, in fact, it will probably confuse you rather than offer an explanation. But Middlegame is so much more than that! If I could recommend one thing, it would be to dive into the story without knowing too much. Everything will be explained properly as you start reading, and it will all make sense, unlike my notes of the blurb.

“But what is perfection, really, if not the act of winning?”

For me, diving into Middlegame transported me into another reality, where alchemy resembles magic. It has been a while since a book did that to me from the first chapter and that is one of the reasons I will remember this book. Middlegame starts with an “end of the world” type of way, and then we go back in time to find out what led to this moment

“Time is like skin: it can scar if you cut it enough times.”

The other fascinating thing for me were the excerpts from “Over the Woodward Wall” by A. Deborah Baker. Deborah Baker was an alchemist and she created Reed. After finishing the book and doing some research, it turns out that this is a real book. And the author, A. Deborah Baker, is a pen name for Seanan McGuire. What an incredible thing to do – I am still in awe of this fact.

As for Seanan McGuire, I have nothing but praise! For all the feelings Middlegame evoked from me. For the incredible writing and for hiding a book within a book. And an author within an author, within a character. I will be definitely continuing “Alchemical Journeys” and reading “Seasonal Fears”, the second book in the series, as well as “Over the Woodward Wall”. 

“In the same ordinary town, on the same ordinary street, lived two ordinary children who had never quite managed to cross paths.”

From “Over the Woodward Wall” by A. Deborah Baker

About The Author:

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire [BOOK REVIEW]

Seanan McGuire is an American author and filker. McGuire is known for her urban fantasy novels. She uses the pseudonym Mira Grant to write science fiction/horror and the pseudonym A. Deborah Baker to write the “Up-and-Under” children’s portal fantasy series.

Social Media:
| WishlistKo-fi | FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest |

Book Review · Books

The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon [BOOK REVIEW]

The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon [BOOK REVIEW]

I was surprised by how much I really enjoyed The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon. When I picked the book up, I knew I was looking at an international bestseller, but I still had my doubts. Well, not anymore…

About The Book:

The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 452

Format I read it in: Paperback

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK | Amazon US

★★★★

Synopsis:

The year is 2059. Nineteen-year-old Paige Mahoney is working in the criminal underworld of Scion London, based at Seven Dials, employed by a man named Jaxon Hall. Her job: to scout for information by breaking into people’s minds. For Paige is a dreamwalker, a clairvoyant and, in the world of Scion, she commits treason simply by breathing.

It is raining the day her life changes for ever. Attacked, drugged and kidnapped, Paige is transported to Oxford – a city kept secret for two hundred years, controlled by a powerful, otherworldly race. Paige is assigned to Warden, a Rephaite with mysterious motives. He is her master. Her trainer. Her natural enemy. But if Paige wants to regain her freedom she must allow herself to be nurtured in this prison where she is meant to die.

The Bone Season introduces a compelling heroine and also introduces an extraordinary young writer, with huge ambition and a teeming imagination. Samantha Shannon has created a bold new reality in this riveting debut.

My Thoughts:

The Bone Season gripped me from the start. Literally from the first chapter, I was alongside Paige, getting to know her clairvoyance as she’s discovering it herself. Paige is a character that you want to root for, but you also want to understand the other side, just to ensure she’s making the right decisions. Meeting the gang in the underworld of Scion London gave me an introduction of the dystopian world that Paige lives in. Clairvoyant people are being imprisoned left, right and centre, and when something goes horribly bad for Paige, she discovers that it could be much, much worse. And somehow she managed to end up there.

“I fitted with these people. They understood the strangeness of my world, a world I was only just beginning to discover.”

The world building in this book is on another level.

Samantha Shannon created a world with different orders of Clairvoyance. On top of that, she created dystopian cities and a different type of creatures that have a role to play as well. Through Paige, we meet so many vivid characters, all unique and lovable in their own way.

I loved the chapters when Paige would reminisce about her past. It helped me understand her so much better and it ties very well with the story in the present. I also loved how the parts with the past tie into the plot to create a plot twist in itself. I feel like every scene was created the way it was with a certain purpose. To serve a bigger role and to tie into the plot in one way or another. But it never felt as if a scene was written just for the sake of it.

One of my favourite parts in this book were the parts focusing on emotion.

There isn’t a romance in this book, so to speak. But there were moments of building connections. Of building trust. Times of sharing experiences, memories and big heartbreaks. But all these moments were an addition to a friendship that turned into a little bit more. It only complimented a personality, rather than become a main focus of the story, which made these moments even more special.

“I didn’t believe in hearts. I believed in dreamscapes and spirits. Those were what mattered. Those made money. But my heart had hurt that day. For the first time in my life, I’d been forced to acknowledge my heart, and acknowledge its fragility. It could be bruised. It could humiliate me.”

And that ending… When that ending happened, it shattered me in a very delicate way. I grieved for one reason, but felt joy for another. The bittersweet taste is still between my fingers, feeling it as I was closing the last pages. But there is one thing for sure – this story doesn’t end here and I’ll sure as hell read the next book in the series.

About The Author:

The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon [BOOK REVIEW]

Samantha Shannon studied English Language and Literature at St. Anne’s College, Oxford. The Bone Season, the first in a seven-book series, was a New York Times bestseller and the inaugural Today Book Club selection.

Her next novel, The Priory of the Orange Tree, was published in February 2019 and became a New York Times and Sunday Times bestseller. Her work has been translated into twenty-six languages. She lives in London.

Social Media:
| WishlistKo-fi | FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest |

Book Review · Books

Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline [BOOK REVIEW]

When I first found out that there is a sequel called Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline, I was so excited! But I was also doubtful whether it would live up to the hype. Writing this review was a bit hard for me, considering how much I loved the first book, but here we go.

Synopsis:

Days after Oasis founder James Halliday’s contest, Wade Watts makes a discovery that changes everything. Hidden within Halliday’s vault, waiting for his heir to find, lies a technological advancement that will once again change the world and make the Oasis a thousand times more wondrous, and addictive, than even Wade dreamed possible.

With it comes a new riddle and a new quest. A last Easter egg from Halliday, hinting at a mysterious prize. And an unexpected, impossibly powerful, and dangerous new rival awaits, one who will kill millions to get what he wants. Wade’s life and the future of the Oasis are again at stake, but this time the fate of humanity also hangs in the balance.

My Thoughts:

Everyone my age remembers where they were and what they were doing when they read Ready Player One. I remember I was listening to the audiobook, wonderfully narrated by Wil Wheaton. It was the first audiobook I ever listened to, and I loved everything about it. The plot, the Oasis, the easter egg contest, the 80’s references. And for me, Ready Player One ended perfectly. Wade won the contest, and everything was fine.

So you can imagine my surprise and excitement when I heart that there is a sequel coming. Of course I was excited! But I was doubtful at the same time. A little bit afraid that this new book wouldn’t live up to my expectations.

Ready Player Two starts very soon after the first book ends, and Wade and his friends uncover a new set of technology, where people can now feel and touch things in the Oasis. But something goes wrong and a villain appears. Only this time, the stakes are very high. People’s lives are in danger. And Wade and his friends must go onto another quest, gathering seven stones, to save everyone!

The quest element was basically the same as the easter egg contest.

Except this time, there were different puzzles and the stakes were higher, with a very tight deadline. I was not impressed at this part at all, and not even the 80’s references could help anymore. Some of the quests went on and on, making me fall asleep on my hardcover book a couple of times. And then, some of them were completed in two pages or less, not given any attention.

Then we had our main hero, Wade, who I started to despise. The Wade I knew from the first book suddenly turned into this rich douchebag that had a God complex. He definitely forgot where he started, and how humble he used to be. He does change a bit in the end, but I gave up on him way before that happened, so I didn’t care.

To be fair, the second part of the book wasn’t that bad, which is why I gave this review an extra star. I loved the final battle, and I’ll be honest, I might even watch that second movie, just to see that scene in action.

But let’s be honest. Ready Player One ended as it ended, and it didn’t need a second book. If feels as if everyone involved in the first book and movie loved the revenue, and decided to milk it as long as it is popular. Because we all love the idea of the Oasis and will keep reading things that feature it. And that’s what gives me the ick.

There is no easy way to say this. When people would ask me about sci-fi recommendations, I would instantly say: “You have to read Ready Player One by Ernest Cline!”. Now, when people ask me the same, I say this: “Ready Player One is amazing! But don’t read the second book. It’s not worth it.”

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK | Amazon US

Social Media:
| WishlistKo-fi | FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest |

Book Review · Books

Beneath The World, A Sea by Chris Beckett [BOOK REVIEW]

Beneath The World, A Sea by Chris Beckett [BOOK REVIEW]

★★★

Beneath The World, A Sea by Chris Beckett is a book I won through ReadersFirst, published by Corvus. And to be honest, Beneath the World, A Sea wouldn’t have been my first choice, because I don’t often go outside my comfort zone. I am so glad I did though, because I really enjoyed this book a lot!

Synopsis:

Beneath The World, A Sea by Chris Beckett is a story told mainly by Ben, the policeman. The story is also told from other people’s points of view as well, all connecting to Ben in one way or the other. 

A number of people go on a journey to Submundo Delta, all with different missions and plans in mind. During this trip, they have to go through a place called Nus, where no one can remember their duration of their stay there. 

In Submundo Delta, the people that live there are called Mundinos. However, there are also creatures that live in the forest, called duendes. And the duendes want to get closer to the Mundinos, which results in them getting killed vigorously. 

Ben is sent there to investigate why the local people are killing the duendes. During his investigation, he meets different people and gets a chance to have some weird encounters with the duendes themselves. 

My Thoughts of Beneath the World, A Sea:

Beneath the World, A Sea is very philosophical and deep science fiction, and definitely not for everyone. It touches on many topics, but mostly the topic of self-discovery. Who are we? Who are we really? How do we get to be the person we actually are? Are we hiding any hidden intentions? Are we just performing a play and not letting people see behind the curtain? What if there is a place we can truly be ourselves? And we don’t remember it after? Would we be murderers, or samaritans? 

This book will make you wonder, all while maintaining the story and introducing interesting characters. Ben is trying to discover who he really is, Hyacinth seems to somehow know everything he’s about to experience, Rico has a relationship with the duendes like no one else, Jael is extremely smart but chose to do something else with her life, Justine had her heart broken and never had the courage to leave… Beneath the World, A Sea is a unique experience with fantastical elements in it. It is also very well written, with intriguing plot twists and a very unexpected ending. I especially loved the intrigue that involved a certain diary. It kept me hooked until the very end. 

Even though a very unique and niche book that won’t appeal to all, I warmly recommend it, as I think this is the perfect book to get you out of your comfort zone and take you on a unique adventure.

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK |Amazon US |

Social Media:
| WishlistKo-fi | FacebookTwitterGoodreadsInstagramPinterest |