Book Review · Books

Do No Harm by Jack Jordan [BOOK REVIEW]

Do No Harm by Jack Jordan [BOOK REVIEW]

I am so happy I had the chance to celebrate the publication of Do No Harm by Jack Jordan and be part of a huge readalong that included patient charts and heart rate monitors. Huge thank you to Tandem Collective, Simon & Schuster and Jack Jordan himself!

About The Book:

Do No Harm by Jack Jordan [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 432

Genre: Medical Thriller, Suspense, Mystery

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Format I read it in: Paperback, Uncorrected Proof

Rating: ★★★★★

My Thoughts:

Anna is a surgeon and quite good at her job. She is also a mother to 4-year-old Zack and is going through a divorce. She’s scheduled to do a surgery on a VIP patient, but when she gets home, her world is about to change – for the worse! Her son has been kidnapped and the only way to save him is to kill her patient on the operating table.

And in Do No Harm, this seems to be only the beginning. While we are following Anna’s point of view and her impossible options to choose from, we also get to meet Margot and Rachel. Margot works as a nurse, together with Anna, and has some financial hardships that make her do things she wouldn’t usually do. And Rachel works in the police and has her own tragedy that unable her to move forward with her life. When a lot of things start to happen, the lives of these three women will intertwine and bring out sides of them they didn’t know existed.

Through the stories of these three women, a lot of intense moments happen. This book had me glued to my seat, flipping pages and unable to stop until I finished it.

What would you do? Would you Save or Kill the Patient?

When we started the readalong for this book, we were asked to choose whether we would kill or save the patient. I’ll be honest, for me it was a straightforward and also an unpopular decision. I chose to save the patient. My thoughts at the time were that if the people that took my child had the power to blackmail me, I probably can’t save him anyways, so I might as well not lose my medical licence. However, throughout the book, I changed my decision too many times. As I read the initial circumstances of Anna’s situation, and also reading the plot twists throughout the story, my initial choice went back and forth like a ball on a tennis court.

Reading Do No Harm was such a thrill! Every chapter is suspenseful and you never know in which direction the plot is about to go next. I definitely didn’t expect the ending and even now, days after finishing the book, I am still trying to figure everything out. That’s how shocked this book made me feel.

Do No Harm is the book version of the most intense Grey’s Anatomy episode. That’s the only way I can explain this book in one sentence. It has the hospital setting, the chilling suspenseful moments and never-ending action. And on top of it all, it has a character that’s been given an impossible choice. Do No Harm is a must-read. It will get your heart rate up for sure!

About The Author:

Do No Harm by Jack Jordan [BOOK REVIEW]

Author of Anything for Her, My Girl, A Woman Scorned, Before Her Eyes, and Night by Night. My next thriller, Do No Harm, is published 26th May 2022.

Instagram: (@JackJordan_author)
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Blog Tour · Book Review · Books

The Game by Scott Kershaw [BLOG TOUR]

The Game by Scott Kershaw [BLOG TOUR]. The Game is definitely one of those books that instantly grabs your attention.

A very big thank you to the team at HQ Stories, for sending me a copy of The Game by Scott Kershaw. Make sure you follow the other mentioned bloggers above for their reviews of this book. The Game is definitely one of those books that instantly grabs your attention.

The Game by Scott Kershaw [BLOG TOUR]. The Game is definitely one of those books that instantly grabs your attention.

About The Book:

The Game by Scott Kershaw [BLOG TOUR]. The Game is definitely one of those books that instantly grabs your attention.


Pages: 429

Genre: Mystery, Thriller

Publisher: HQ Stories

Format I read it in: Hardcover

Rating: ★★★★/★

Synopsis:

As soon as I read the synopsis, I wanted to know what this game is all about. We are introduced to five people, and someone they love goes missing and they receive a message to start playing the game. There can only be one winner and they cannot share this message or seek help from anyone. If they lose this game, their loved one will die.

My Thoughts:

The first half of the book feels like a prolonged introduction. There is a slight issue with pacing, due to us reading five chapters for five different characters, all having to do the same few tasks. For example – they need to buy a prepaid phone and come to a certain location.

Whilst this is great in terms of character building, and us understanding each character’s back story, at times it felt like a recycled content. Once the game officially starts, my reading experience improved significantly. There is a lot of tension and uneasy atmosphere that I quite enjoyed. We discover a lot of secrets about the players and see how each of them deals with the situation they are into.

Writing this review now, it’s extremely hard to not reveal anything. The big reveal was very unexpected, that’s all I will say! It took me by surprise still, even though I had my suspicions and picked up on a few clues along the way. The ending was dark and twisty and it was interesting to see the aftermath of everything. A lot of questions were raised regarding morality and taking responsibility of small decisions that may have a huge impact in the long run. There are definitely a lot of topics for discussion, and I can see this book being a great pick for a book club. It kept me glued from start to finish. The game aspect of the book satisfied me and the gripping ending was a masterpiece. Don’t miss this one out, despite its difficult beginning.

The Game is Scott Kershaw’s debut novel, although his writing doesn’t feel like a debut author’s writing. I will definitely keep Scott on my radar and look out for his next books.

About The Author:

The Game by Scott Kershaw [BLOG TOUR]. The Game is definitely one of those books that instantly grabs your attention.

Scott Kershaw lives in Lincolnshire, in a Victorian cottage that was formerly ruled by mice. He likes the crackle of vinyl, the smell of paperbacks, the taste of a stiff drink and the view from a front row barrier. He’s getting too old and heavy for crowd-surfing, but that rarely stops him from trying. His first real love was cinema. His beagle, Darwin, is the one true king of dogs. As a child, Scott believed in monsters. Sometimes he still does. The Game is his debut thriller.

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Book Review · Books

Lemon by Kwon Yeo-sun [BOOK REVIEW]

Lemon by Kwon Yeo-sun [BOOK REVIEW]

First of all, I want to say thank you to the team at Head of Zeus for sending me a copy of Lemon by Kwon Yeo-sun for me to read and review. This book was truly a unique reading experience.

About The Book:

Lemon by Kwon Yeo-sun [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 176

Genre: Fiction

Publisher: Head of Zeus

Format I read it in: Hardcover

Rating: ★★/★★

Synopsis:

There were a few reasons why I was interested in this book. The vivid colours on the cover shouted radiance and mystery. The title is intriguing and I was wondering how it connected to the story. The synopsis starts off as a thriller, but dives into the unknown. And finally, I love exploring translated works because I always learn something new.

Lemon is a story that features the murder of a 19-year-old Kim Hae-on. Known as the High School Beauty Murder, there are instantly two suspects: Shin Jeongjun, a rich kid in whose car Hae-on was last seen, and Han Manu, a delivery boy who witnessed Hae-on in Shin Jeongjun’s passenger seat. When no evidence can be pinned on both boys, the case goes cold.

My Thoughts:

If you are looking for a mystery thriller, I’m afraid this book is not it. We may or may not find out the truth behind the murder. It doesn’t even matter. What we will definitely see though, is the aftermath. The lives this murder impacted and how they are getting on seventeen years after the murder.

Although this murder is the big event that drives everything, Lemon actually focuses on the people that survived. 17 years after the murder, the grief takes a big toll on Hae-on’s little sister, Da-on. Da-on is struggling to move on with her life. She lives more in the past than she does in the present. She even does some very dramatic things, all in the hope to be able to find out what happened to her older sister and move on.

“Death carves a clear line between the dead and the living,’ she said in a solemn tone. ‘The dead are over there and the rest of us are over here. When someone dies, no matter how great they were, it’s like drawing a permanent line between that person and the rest of humanity. If birth means begging to join the side of the living, then death has the power to kick everyone out. That’s why I think death, with its power to sever things forever, is far more objective, more dignified, than birth, which is the starting point of everything.”

I felt for Da-on. She felt she had a responsibility all her life. And she feels like she failed to protect her sister. I also felt for their mum. It was interesting to find out about her believing in bad omens. When Hae-on was a baby, she was supposed to be called Hye-eun. But the dad called her Hae-on due to his accent and this name stayed. Because of this, the mother thinks her daughter’s destiny has also changed. After Hae-on dies, the mum tries to change her name, but they won’t allow it. That scene was very heartbreaking. But it also made me wonder. I’ve never thought to ask that question before. Can you actually change a deceased person’s name? I tried to find information on this (specifically for the UK), but I wasn’t able to find anything, so I am assuming it’s not possible.

Aside from Hae-on’s family, we get to know more about the lives of the two suspects at that time. And also some of Hae-on’s classmates. It is very notable that this murder has a huge impact on a lot of people, and they all deal with it very differently. In some of the scenes where Da-on meets with these people, you can notice the awkwardness and rawness is still present, even after years have passed.

Even though it’s not the most suspenseful fiction novel, I still recommend it. I read it in a day and it did keep me intrigued. It was a different take on an aftermath of a murder, and I enjoyed it. I also learned a few new things, which I always cherish in my reading adventures!

About The Author:

Lemon by Kwon Yeo-sun [BOOK REVIEW]

Kwon Yeo-sun was born in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province of South Korea in 1965. Kwon enjoyed a brilliant literary debut in 1996 when her novel Niche of Green was awarded the Sangsang Literary Award. At the time, novels that reflected on the period of the democratization movement in South Korea, were prevalent.

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Book Review · Books

The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman [BOOK REVIEW]

The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman [BOOK REVIEW]

The Devouring Gray has a very gripping introduction. I love a trope when a new person comes to town. And add to this a small town with founding families that all keep secrets. Very creepy small town setting and danger looming. I loved this book and can’t wait for the next one.

About The Book:

The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 389

Format I read it in: Paperback

Publisher: Titan Books

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK | Amazon US

★★★★

Synopsis:

Branches and stones, daggers and bones,
They locked the Beast away.

After the death of her sister, seventeen-year-old Violet Saunders finds herself dragged to Four Paths, New York. Violet may be a newcomer, but she soon learns her mother isn’t: They belong to one of the revered founding families of the town, where stone bells hang above every doorway and danger lurks in the depths of the woods.

Justin Hawthorne’s bloodline has protected Four Paths for generations from the Gray—a lifeless dimension that imprisons a brutal monster. After Justin fails to inherit his family’s powers, his mother is determined to keep this humiliation a secret. But Justin can’t let go of the future he was promised and the town he swore to protect.

Ever since Harper Carlisle lost her hand to an accident that left her stranded in the Gray for days, she has vowed revenge on the person who abandoned her: Justin Hawthorne. There are ripples of dissent in Four Paths, and Harper seizes an opportunity to take down the Hawthornes and change her destiny-to what extent, even she doesn’t yet know.

The Gray is growing stronger every day, and its victims are piling up. When Violet accidentally unleashes the monster, all three must band together with the other Founders to unearth the dark truths behind their families’ abilities—before the Gray devours them all.

My Thoughts:

It was so easy for me to get sucked into the story. Even though we have four founding families with a lot of characters and different histories, it wasn’t too hard to understand how they all fit into the story as a whole. If you have read “We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart, you can feel the same vibe from this book too. The adventures of the group, their personal stories, secrets and battles. Their eagerness to defeat the status quo and the Gray.

“She thought about heroes, and villains, and legends, and monsters. And decided that whoever told the story was more powerful than all of them.”

Without spoiling anything, the danger that looms over this town is unique. There is a strangeness and an eeriness. The spookiness that an episode of “Stranger Things” can bring. And in this whole world, where things are very real, but they seem very unreal, we have our main characters. They make this fictional town seem very real. They make us readers believe this is the normal, and I believed them throughout the book. The family roots and history tales, the power and responsibility they carry. Their bravery to fight something they know is very dangerous.

Violet was my first favourite character. But very shortly after she arrived, Harper because the queen in my eyes. And then all of them, every single one of them. Now, I am most intrigued by Isaac. But maybe because his story is not told in full. He’s yet to share the full tale and when he does, I’ll be here for it.

“People could hurt each other without being monsters. And they could love each other without being saints.”

The Devouring Gray is that YA fantasy thriller that you’ve been waiting for. It will give you the chills and the feels. New girl comes in town with a mystery town eerie twist is something that should intrigue anyone. I will be eagerly waiting for book 2.

About The Author:

The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman [BOOK REVIEW]

Born in New York City but raised in Japan and Hong Kong, Christine Lynn Herman subscribes to the firm philosophy that home is where her books are. She returned to the United States for college, where she traded out a subtropical climate for harsh, snowy winters and an Honors English degree at the University of Rochester. Currently, Christine and her books reside in Brooklyn, along with her partner and their extremely spoiled cat.

Her debut novel, THE DEVOURING GRAY, will be released by Disney Hyperion on April 2, 2019, with a sequel to come the following year.

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Book Review · Books

Death Threats And Other Stories by Georges Simenon [BOOK REVIEW]

Death Threats And Other Stories by Georges Simenon [BOOK REVIEW]

The team at Penguin were kind enough to send me a copy of Death Threats and Other Stories by Georges Simenon. I remember my grandma calling me “Inspector Maigret” when I was small and nosy, and I know he was a famous book character, but this memory somehow fogged up, until I encountered the name again. And I knew I was going to be in for a ride.

About The Book:

Death Threats And Other Stories by Georges Simenon [BOOK REVIEW]


Pages: 180

Format I read it in: Paperback

Publisher: Penguin Books

Purchase Links:
Amazon UK

★★★★

Synopsis:

This new selection of short stories featuring Inspector Maigret – three of which are published in English for the first time – takes the detective from a mysterious death in a Cannes hotel to a love triangle in the Loire countryside and a bitter rivalry within a Parisian family.

My Thoughts:

As a whole, I really enjoyed the short stories. I met Inspector Maigret and I really loved his approach to the murders and investigations. He has certain ways of doing things that intrigue me. He takes the “thinking outside of the box” and brings it to a whole new level. Below I have listed all the short stories in this collection, alongside with a brief description of the synopsis and my thoughts for each story. There are NO spoilers, however, as these are short stories, sometimes even the synopsis can be too much, so read at your own risk. 🙂

The Improbable Monsieur Owen

When a murder happens in a hotel where Inspector Maigret is staying at, he tries not to be involved. However, his curiosity gets the better of him. I love how he planned to find out the killer and his execution. However, I wasn’t too happy with the fact that the guilty person didn’t get the punishment they deserves. I found this to be a very interesting frustration, because in other books we don’t always get the information of what happens after. We just assume someone gets a proper punishment – and I found this only bothered me just now.

The Men at the Grand Cafe

Inspector Maigret goes to the Grand Cafe regularly to play cards with the locals. One day, the butcher is murdered as he was returning from the Cafe. As soon as the news spread, the inspector decides that he wants nothing to do with the investigation. Various people visit him at home; to share secrets, alibis, ask him for help, but he refuses to say anything. It’s very interesting to see that despite him being uninterested, he very much enjoys the attention he gets with people coming to him. I enjoyed how the story unravelled, although I can’t understand the reason why someone would decide to act in such a way, when everything could have been less impactful.

The Man on the Streets

A murder happens and Maigret is doing a re-construction and fake arrest the next day. One guy is interested and the follow him around for days. After a few days of these shenanigans, inspector Maigret thinks of something very clever that makes this guy to start talking. I liked the inspector’s unorthodox approach to this case and the mind games he was also playing. I wonder if practices like these are today forbidden due to the distress it may cause to some individuals, but it was cleverly written and I certainly enjoyed it.

Candle Auction

The night before an auction happens in the small town, a guy full of cash is murdered. Inspector Maigret is asking all people that were in that inn to keep doing whatever they were doing that night. This way, he can reconstruct the night before the murder. After a series of events, the inspector is able to find the guilty person and close the case. It was a very short story, but one of the most captivating ones in the book.

Death Threats

The chief speaks with inspector Maigret and tells him about the unusual case: Monsieur Grosbois received a death threat. Maigret spends some time in the house. He gets to find out about all the family members and their dirty family secrets and arguments. What I found interesting was that none of the family members were trying to hide what went on in the family and they argued as if the inspector was never here. Usually, even if you don’t get along with someone in your family, when a guest comes over, you do your best to be friendly and keep the peace, but this wasn’t the case with this family and I was intrigued by that. Emile, scared of the death threat, makes the whole family sit on the terrace the whole day. In the evening, a murder attempt does happen – and inspector Maigret gives an interesting explanation.

Overall, I really enjoyed this collection of short stories, and I am definitely a fan of Maigret’s way of investigation and the way his thinking process works. He comes up with clever ideas to trick the murderers into falling into his trap. It’s very easy to read the stories as they are very gripping. I would warmly recommend this collection as the perfect introduction to Inspector Maigret’s adventures!

About The Author:

Georges Simenon Inspector Maigret author writer

Georges Joseph Christian Simenon (1903 – 1989) was a Belgian writer. A prolific author who published nearly 500 novels and numerous short works, Simenon is best known as the creator of the fictional detective Jules Maigret.
Although he never resided in Belgium after 1922, he remained a Belgian citizen throughout his life.

Simenon was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed.

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